Baby pterosaurs were cute, defenceless and unable to fly

Over 200 pterosaur eggs have been found at a site in China, the largest such discovery on record, and the embryos inside reveal what newly-hatched pterosaurs were like

The largest ever collection of pterosaur eggs and embryos has been found in north-west China. It includes 215 eggs, some with intact embryos. The “Pterosaur Park” is evidence that these pterosaur babies were born flightless and needed looking after, and that their parents nested in huge shared colonies.

The first flying vertebrates and the biggest animals to ever get off the ground, pterosaurs evolved some 220 million years ago from a group of reptiles that gave rise to crocodiles, dinosaurs, and later birds. The species studied, Hamipterus tianshanensis, lived in the early Cretaceous nearly 120 million

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